Want to Stay Fit? Say ‘No’ to Fatty Food

Want to Stay Fit? Say ‘No’ to Fatty Food

The findings of a new research are out today, and they are suggesting people to eat lesser fatty foods as eating too much of fatty foods can cause brain damage and it has also been linked to obesity.

The US scientists, after studying the results of the study, said that changes to a high-fat diet usually triggers inflammation, which further produces different scarring in the rodent brains that regulates the weight of the body.

The researchers, on noticing similar scarring in the key area of rodent brains as is generally seen in stroke patients, started observing a brain scarring in humans who were affected by obesity or overweight problems.

Though they are lacking enough evidence to prove that brain damage caused by fatty food can have a major link to obesity, they claim that the findings of the study are strongly indicating the same and therefore further research is required to arrive on any concrete conclusion.

“It would be unlikely you could injure that part of the brain and not affect the level of bodyweight, because that's what that area does”, said Mr. Michael Schwartz, the Director of University of Washington's Diabetes and Obesity Centre of Excellence. “Fast foods are more likely to do this sort of damage" he added further in his statement over the issue”, he added.

Every human body has different weight and tendencies. Loosing kilos, or gaining kilos, by adjusting diet only gives temporary changes to the human body, and these changes revert before long. Therefore, the person gets back to his/her original and natural weight once all the restrictions are removed and no diet chart is followed.

The researchers cleared their base by discussing about the fat producing hormone, called leptin, and the way it works in the human body. The brain area primarily regulates metabolism of the body and relies on leptin that perfectly measures all the changes occurring in the body weight.

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