Male ‘Y’ Chromosome Extinction Theory Gets a Long Hock

Male ‘Y’ Chromosome Extinction Theory Gets a Long Hock

“Men may well not get extinct ever”, that’s what has been claimed by a recently conducted study. As a result, the direct impact is now set to get higher on an earlier research that stressed on a strange fact that the Y sex chromosome, which are only carried by men, are genetically decaying at the velocity of knots and it was therefore anticipated that it will be growing out of sight during the course of next five million years or thereabout.

A gene carried by the chromosome is said to be the main steering mechanism that has inspired a variety of testes fabrication as well as the emission of male hormones.

However, a new twist is now knocking the doors as a recently conducted study, which was carried out by researchers from the US, has claimed that the genetic decaying has ended all of sudden and therefore there are no major chances that the hormones with be wiped out at all from the surface of earth in the time to follow.

The study, which has been made available in the recent edition of the journal Nature, was shepherd by Prof. Jennifer Graves from the Australian National University. During the course of study, it has been claimed by the experts that earlier studies which suggested that the Y chromosome are likely to get wiped out in the time to follow are no longer relevant as per the tangible picture.

However, it is fairly evident that the earlier theories were based on the frequency at which the said genes are decaying from the male chromosomes.

While expressing his opinion regarding the findings of the study, along with mentioning their importance when it comes to the so-called estimations related to extinction of male chromosomes, the lead author of the study said: “The Y is not going anywhere and gene loss has probably come to a halt”.


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