Cray to Build Supercomputer That’ll Manage Nuclear Arms

Cray to Build Supercomputer That’ll Manage Nuclear Arms

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has entered into a deal with Cray, Seattle-based supercomputer-maker, to develop a supercomputer to manage nuclear weapons.

Named as Trinity, the supercomputer would prove as the world's fastest one and will be made for $174 million. It will ensure the safety, security and effectiveness of the US nuclear weapons. The supercomputer will be installed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Cray unveiled plans about what systems they are thinking to add in Trinity. The supercomputer-maker said they will fit the new device with Intel Haswell and Knights Landing processors. The supercomputer yet to be made will include 82 petabyes of storage and 1.7 terabytes per second of continuous performance.

Trinity will be able to run all its applications eight times faster than Cieleo, a supercomputer, installed at Los Almos. Cielo has a speed of 1.37 petaflops. "The NNSA has consistently deployed the world's most advanced supercomputing systems to support their critical mission of ensuring the health of our nation's nuclear stockpile", affirmed Cray president and CEO Peter Ungaro.

Ungaro said Trinity will be vertically integrated as there are some systems in which a vertically integrated system works best.

Ungaro feels proud that once again NNSA has levied trust in Cray to help them in such an important mission. Trinity, which is expected to be delivered by the mid of 2015, is a joint effort between the New Mexico Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories as part of the NNSA Advanced Simulation and Computing Program. Once Trinity is active then it could also be used to assess the efficiency of nuclear weapons.


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