Lake Tahoe Challenged by Drought, Wildfires and Climate Change

Lake Tahoe Challenged by Drought, Wildfires and Climate Change

Concerns were raised about Lake Tahoe, a freshwater lake that straddles the California-Nevada border, US, in an annual summit on Tuesday. The lake, also known as the crown jewel of the western landscape, is facing threats from drought, invasive species like quagga mussels and Asian clams, catastrophic wildfire and climate change.

Members attending the summit have urged the authorities to take steps to protect the iconic lake. The issue brought bipartisan consensus among the parties. It has been said that many forests have become too thick with trees, which has been causing diseases and also leading high-intensity wildfires.

Republican Tom McClintock of California suggested that revenue generated from logging can be used to improve the condition of forests. More than 300 participants attended the summit. Democratic U. S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California shared that it is not easy to remove dead, dying and overcrowding trees from the forests before and after wildfire incidents.

There are so many regulations that make the removal process quite a difficult one. She cited an example after more than 70 years, grassy alpine meadows around the lake, have now changed into dense forests. Many members are trying that additional $415 million in federal money should be utilized to fight invasive species.

Other problems like fire danger and ways to reduce erosion should also be considered. At the summit, a proclamation has also been signed by federal and state officials from both states (California and Nevada) and both political parties. As per the agreement, they will support timber reduction and wildfire prevention efforts.

In 2007, wildfire incident took place in which more than 250 homes near Lake Tahoe were destroyed. Many members think that the incident has made people learn a tough lesson on fire prevention. The summit was organized at the Tallac Historic Site.

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