Study finds no link between IVF and risk of breast cancer

Study finds no link between IVF and risk of breast cancer

A new study claimed that women who undergo in-vitro fertilization may not suffer an increased risk of breast cancer. It found that the treatment is not associated with the illness concerned. The study, published in the journal JAMA, was conducted by scientists at the Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam.

A large and 21 years long study conducted on more than 25,000 women in the Netherlands had found that women who went through IVF between 1983 and 1995 were no more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer compared to both the general population and women who were treated for infertility but didn’t undergo IVF at around the same time.

However, the recent study which studied different types of infertility treatments instead of building comparison as done by the earlier study. Therefore, its results are perceived as more precise to assess the possible effect of IVF treatments on cancer risk. There always arises a possibility that women facing infertility are more likely to suffer from cancer due to hormone imbalances caused by infertility.

The study researchers found risk of breast cancer considerably lower in women who had seven or more IVF cycles, when compared with those who had just one or two IVF cycles. The risk was significantly lower in the case of women responded poorly to their first IVF cycle. In follow up of more than 20 years, there was no increase in the incidences of both groups of women who underwent some kind of infertility treatment.

Brest cancer is the most common cancer in women around the world. The risk of developing breast cancer increases with IVF. That is why; health care providers are increasingly becoming concerned about an association between breast cancer risk and IVF.

According to a report in Christian Post by Magnolia Yrasuegui, "A study published by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) revealed that the chances of getting breast cancer because of IVF is insignificant. According to the study, going through IVF—or choosing not to—does not have bearing in terms of increasing the possibility of having breast cancer."

The American Society of Reproductive Medicine pegs the average cost of an IVF treatment cycle at $12,400. This could go up contingent on the location and the medications that will be needed by the patient after the treatment. A candidate should also factor in the number of IVF cycles needed and how much the insurance company will pay for the treatment.

The chances of couples who cannot conceive naturally have greatly increased because science and studies, like the one done by JAMA. These findings help them decide which treatment is best. Statistically, getting pregnant through IVT may not be close to 100 percent, but at least the fear of increasing the chances of breast cancer can now be laid to rest. Myth busted.

A report published in Huffington Post revealed, "A large study of over 25,000 women in the Netherlands concluded that after about 21 years, women who went through IVF between 1983 and 1995 were no more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer compared to both the general population and women who were treated for infertility but didn’t undergo IVF at around the same time."

“These findings are consistent with absence of a significant increase in long-term risk of breast cancer among IVF-treated women,” wrote the researchers. The study was published in the journal JAMA and conducted by scientists at the Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam.

In addition to finding no increased risk for women who had IVF treatment, the researchers found that cancer risk was significantly lower for women who had seven or more IVF cycles, compared to women who had just one or two IVF cycles. Breast cancer risk was also significantly lower for women who had a poor response to their first IVF cycle. There was also no increased incidence in followup greater than 20 years for both groups of women who underwent some kind of infertility treatment.

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