Human Hand Dexterity belongs to more than Half a Million Years Earlier than Previously Thought

Human Hand Dexterity belongs to more than Half a Million Years Earlier than Prev

Researchers have revealed that origin of human hand dexterity dates back to more than half million years earlier than what was previously thought. Scientists reached at the above conclusion after studying an ancient bone that was discovered at a burial site in Kenya.

According to reports of PNAS journal, the bone presented researchers the best example of a well-preserved metacarpal that connects to the index finger. The bone in all regards relates to the modern human, said researchers.

The fossil is the earliest evidence of a time period when human learnt to use a strong enough grip to use tools effectively. Same anatomical features were not developed in apes, said researchers.

Researchers have been able to gain insight into human morphological feature associated with enhanced hand function with the help of 1.42 million-year-old metacarpal from an ancient hominin.

The findings revealed that evolution of the modern human hand began more than 600,000 years earlier than what was previously believed.

Ward is a professor of pathology and anatomical sciences at the University of Missouri, Columbia. He said apes and earlier human lacked the styloid process when they tried to use tools. He added, "The styloid process reflects an increased dexterity that allowed early human species to use powerful yet precise grips when manipulating objects". Earlier humans gradually learnt to use better hand dexterity.

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